Hand-wound watches

1. Winding the watch

Wind your watch by turning the crown clockwise between thumb and index finger until you feel a marked resistance. Your watch will thank you when you do this regularly. When fully wound your watch has a power reserve of at least 43 hours—or one hour less for models with a date function (switching the date requires a little extra energy). Models Lux and Lambda even have a power reserve of 84 hours.

2. Winding a watch with a power reserve indicator

Wind your watch by turning the crown clockwise between thumb and index finger until you feel a marked resistance. Your watch will thank you when you do this regularly. Fully wound, your watch has a power reserve of at least 43 hours—which is also displayed on its dial. If the red gauge on the power reserve indicator is completely full, your watch needs to be wound up; you can do so by turning the crown.

3. Setting the date

You can set the date by winding the hour hand between eight and one o’clock. For example, if you need to change your watch from the 1st to the 16th September—perhaps after it spent the holidays tucked away safely in a drawer—then you don’t have to wind the hands 30 times around the dial. Start by simply setting the watch to one o’clock the next day, which will change the date. Then wind the hands counterclockwise to around eight thirty in the evening. Now you can wind clockwise to one o’clock, which will change the date again. When you are setting the time afterwards, please check whether you are setting it to ten o’clock in the evening or the morning—as if you get it wrong, the date will change at midday instead of midnight.

Automatic watches

1. Winding the watch

This watch does not need to be wound, as it winds itself as you move. Alternatively, you can wind it by turning the crown clockwise between finger and thumb. In contrast to hand-wound watches, automatic watches do not have a point of resistance once they are fully wound—but there’s nothing to worry about; with the neomatik calibers (DUW 3001 and DUW 6101) the rotor reduces its rate of movement once the watch is fully wound. If you don’t wear your watch, it will have a power reserve of at least 43 hours after being fully wound—or one hour less for models with a date function (switching the date requires a little extra energy).

2. Setting the date

a) The calibers DUW 4101, DUW 4401, DUW 5101, and Zeta

You can set the date by winding the hour hand between eight and one o’clock. For example, if you need to change your watch from the 1st to the 16th September—perhaps after it spent the holidays tucked away safely in a drawer—then you don’t have to wind the hands 30 times around the dial. Start by simply setting the watch to one o’clock the next day, which will change the date. Then wind the hands counterclockwise to around eight thirty in the evening. Now you can wind clockwise to one o’clock, which will change the date again. When you are setting the time afterwards, please check whether you are setting it to ten o’clock in the evening or the morning—as if you get it wrong, the date will change at midday instead of midnight. 

b) The NOMOS neomatik caliber DUW 6101

Watches with this neomatik caliber can be set even more quickly. In the second crown position—which can be found by pulling out the crown just a little—the date can be set forward and backwards with ease; just a half-turn of the crown will move the date once. Furthermore, DUW 6101 has a very small time frame for the date change: simply avoid resetting the date between 11:15 pm and 0:45 am. If you do so accidently, however, don’t worry; DUW 6101 is constructed so that this will not damage the mechanism. Should the date come to a halt while switching between two dates, simply pull the crown out as far as it will go and set the time to shortly after one o'clock in the morning—or back to 11 o'clock at night. Then the date display will return to its original position.
To set the time, just pull the crown a little further out—into the third position.

3. Setting the time and time zone

A perfectly simple complication: Setting a NOMOS watch with a world-time function is very easy—and accomplished in just three steps.

a. Tangomat GMT

1. Setting the reference time: Press down the button until you see your time zone in the window on the right hand side.

2. Synchronizing the times: With the help of the setting pin, press down the small corrector button—until the hands show the time of the window to the right. 

3. Setting the current time: Just as before—turn the crown to set your local time (remembering the difference between ten o’clock in the morning and the evening).

b. Zürich world time

1. Setting the reference time: Press down the button until you see your time zone on the city dial above (at twelve o’clock).

2. Synchronizing the times: With the help of the setting pin, press down the small corrector button—until the hands show the time of the window to the right. 

3. Setting the current time: Just as before—turn the crown to set your local time (remembering the difference between ten o’clock in the morning and the evening).

Watches from the NOMOS Atelier

Winding a watch with twin mainspring barrels

Wind your watch by turning the crown clockwise between thumb and index finger until you feel a marked resistance. Your watch will thank you when you do this regularly. Fully wound, your watch has a power reserve of at least 84 hours due to its twin mainspring barrel. This also means the crown needs a few more turns until both barrels are fully wound.

Taking care of the watch

1. Case

The casing of most of our watches is made from nickel-free stainless steel and sapphire crystal glass. The only thing harder than this glass is a diamond. In order to protect the steel, it is very slightly raised.

The cases of the golden NOMOS watches are made of 18 carat gold—as beautiful as they are precious. Since gold—both rose and white gold—is softer than steel, for example, you cannot prevent minor scratches—but it also records its life, the most beautiful way to tell your story.

2. Water-resistance

If your NOMOS watch has the addition "20 ATM" on its back, you can go diving with it. The description "10 ATM" reveals that your watch is suitable for swimming and snorkeling; "5 ATM" means that you can shower with your watch on. All other NOMOS watches (including those with no particular denotation of water resistance on their backs) are protected to 3 atm and generally prefer to stay dry. Wearing them while washing your hands will not cause them any problems, but you should take them off before a dip in the pool. It is recommended to have the water resistance of your watch checked once a year by a retailer. It only takes a moment.

Please note: Ahoi comes with a screw-drown crown. Please remember to screw the crown back in after use—as this is the only way to ensure your watch stays water resistant. To do so, gently push down the crown in its default position and turn it clockwise. The crown should never be wound while underwater. 

3. Magnetic fields

Magnetic fields can harm all mechanical watches, so it’s best to avoid them. If you notice any fixed rate deviation, your watch could have been magnetized. A watchmaker can fix this quickly.

4. Service

A mechanical watch should undergo a complete servicing around once every five years. This involves cleaning and replacing the watch oil lubricating it. We recommend you to take your watch to your retailer for this servicing.

How to use the new deployant clasp

Your retailer can mount this NOMOS deployant clasp onto your strap in a moment. With a little finesse and two screwdrivers (with a 1.6 mm wide blade), you can also do it yourself.

Please check every so often whether the screws of your deployant clasp are still sitting tight—and readjust them if required. To be on the safe side, you can use a drop of screw lock lacquer on the head of the screw before tightening.

to the video tutorial